Category Archives: Women

The Amour of Armour

My work explores memory and customs examining society, cultural inheritance, and the natural world. Looking back at women throughout history, I see how far we have come in some regards, yet how little has changed in others. My body of work,  Public Debt to the Suffragette, reflects on the times of 1912-15 through the eyes of 2012-15. The very year that the US congress started to limit women’s rights over their bodies is exactly 100 years after Margaret Sanger initiated what would become Planned Parenthood. I was inspired to honor the female body and use it as a statement about seduction, power, and control; and to question social mores of gender.

For Margaret Sanger's Faith

For Margaret Sanger’s Faith c. Mary Coss

Materials bring with them inherent meaning. Bronze traditionally memorialized moments in time. Here I use it to create a frozen narrative. The long history of bronze casting includes the making of protective war implements, in particular body armor. Using bronze to present intimate imagery creates a different context for the material, the armour becomes reflective of its matters, and it matters how the details are treated. An emerging breast shows both its strength and its vulnerability, yet these forms seem to take on any brutality, including a needle and thread and still withstand.

Inertia

 Inertia c. Mary Coss

 The Unfamiliar Familiar My use of corsets question historical reference and gender roles. It’s written that women donned the first corsets to take a stand, saying no to motherhood and yes to other possibilities. But, mostly we hear the stories of women pursuing the perfect shape, the stories of women who broke or removed ribs to create a body to fit the current ideal. History is storytelling and truth is illusive.

The Familiar Unfamiliar c. Mary Coss

Gilded cAGE (below) reflects on the Gilded Age. It was a time where society lay corrupt under a gilded surface layer. Just as Mark Twain coined this term for the late 19th century, current business and politics have revolved to a similar social condition with the gilding, as a cage for the populace.

2a_Coss_Gilded cAGEI’m interested in working somewhere between the familiar and the uncomfortable. Intimate imagery seduces, but there is more to these stories. I invite you to spend a moment of time to consider the allusions. Just as layers of time encrust our planet, layers of meaning have a way of building up through years and creating something different than what originally existed. In society, these encrustations can propel us forward or move us back. I am betting on our moving forward and hope this work creates a ripple that rolls forward in concert with many others.

Gilded cAGE c. Mary Coss

 

 

Visual Biographies

Visual Biographies is an exhibit that partners artists with the senior residents of The Lakeshore apartments in southeast Seattle. The residents shared their stories and the artists created a Visual Biography of the elder. My partner was Mary Cross.

MaryCrossI smiled at the irony when I first heard my resident partner’s name. After our first phone call I laughed in spite of myself. It was a little bit like the classic skit “who’s on first”. After the initial confusion, we settled on an understanding that our names are very similar, and got on to the business of sharing. We live in a world of uncertainty, and a time of entitlement and indulgence. The openhearted bravery of the residents to allow strangers in to write their story is awe-inspiring. I believe it is an adventurous and courageous act. I was pleased to have the opportunity to spend time with Mary Cross. She was open and compassionate even in the face of being unsure at times as to why I was there and what I was going to do. I feel the best way to honor her and her willingness to partake in this journey is to simply create her portrait. She is a complex individual yet simple in nature, strong yet fragile. It seemed appropriate to create her portrait out of metal, a material that can be both fragile yet strong at the same time. I hope the portrait does her justice and features these traits in a positive way. Thank you Mary Cross for spending time with me, Mary Coss, and sharing your story.

The Sacred You and Me: a culmination

IMG_1179The Sacred You and Me is an arts and culture workshop sponsored by SEEDarts, but more than that it is a community, relations, a family. I recently taught a workshop with elderly women aged 65-95 from varying faiths and ethnic backgrounds. We met weekly to share experience, culture, stories and to express these facets through art making. Immigrant women from southeast Asia sat with East African women, Filipino immigrants and African American women from Seattle as well as the south. Many had never spoken with a woman from another culture. The sharing of food, holiday traditions, and crafts turned into a heartfelt sharing of life’s turning points and one’s deepest held secrets.

IMG_2837I believe when you tap into your creative soul, trust follows. This belief was found true through the words and actions of these women. The women chose a Maya Angelou quote to sum up their final project, a glass mosaic for the foyer of the building, “Try to be a rainbow in someone’s cloud. “ They speak of building community, but beyond that they talk of being more comfortable in their residence, learning to grow through their own prejudices, and finding deeper meaning in their relationships with others, and forgiveness of both others and themselves. One woman came to tears describing her newfound understanding of other races. She confessed of her prejudice as a young women helping in the hospitals of the Philippines, avoiding the black soldiers while she catered to the others.

DSC_0030We went to Jack Straw Productions Recording Studios to record poems, stories, and songs. One women led her reading with a story of healing. “We stormed the heavens with prayer.” These powerful words are poetry and with her performance I felt fulfilled that indeed, these women were poets and artists and had been inspired by sharing, trusting, and tapping into their creative souls.

The mosaic with sound will install in the resident’s foyer this fall.

 

 

 

The Sacred You and Me

16 amazing women showed up for our workshop today, and wrote this story, phrase by phrase as we went around the room, DaDa style.

This is a memory of my husband that I just met. We got to talkin and got to know each other. We took a trip and danced all night, mesmerized with the beautiful flowers he brought. He was tall and handsome, he was fabulous and I loved him so much.

During the trip we met somebody else.

Happy my husband’s alive. I love my daughter and enjoy my children.

We secretly met, me and that other. It is really difficult with another man talking with her own husband. I don’t know how to talk about another man.

Any man will do.
The other man showed me a world that I thought I would never see. Then I woke up, and realized this other man was the mission I would spend my life looking for.

 

Race in the 21st century

Under My Skin: Bringing Race & Social Justice Issues Into Your Classroom

Welded wire

Welded wire

I am proud to be a guest speaker for this important Teacher Workshop at the Wing Luke Museum on October 26th, 8:30-2:30.  I’ll be sharing my experience working with East African High School  girls around issues of identity. I will be showing the beautiful documentary on the project created by Fox Wilmar Productions.

This program is for teachers interested in anti-bias teaching. The workshop augments the current exhibitions on race and identity to explore activities and lesson plans for middle school and high school classrooms.

To register call the front desk at The Wing. For more information, call 206.623-5124 ext 110. Registration fee is $30 (includes lunch). Receive 5 clock hours with $10 fee.